• Back

    September 11 2017

    CHARMS

    In the 19th century, metropolitan Seattle was founded by freemasons, occultists, and spiritualists—but today, it’s being dramatically rebuilt by the tech sector. Out of this strange intersection of energies in the city’s history emerges CHARMS, a biomechanical noise punk trio whose necro-electro sound is akin to a thousand broken computers surging with blue crystal power. Propelled by the piston-like industrial drumming of Ray McCoy, bubbling cauldron guitar of E.J. Tolentino, and the haunted alchemical bass synth of Josh McCormick, the group’s hyper-kinetic freakouts are a manifestation of the anxieties of Seattle—a city staring down what could either be a transhumanist utopian biofuture or a posthumanist dystopian decline.  

    It’s a concept the band drives home both sonically and visually with the help of projectionist Kevin Blanquies. Charms frequently plays shows in front of live feeds of themselves performing, the video feeding back on itself into an uneasy infinity as the group writhes around in epileptic fits. The future, as Charms’ music, weighs heavy, and there’s no telling where the intersection of man and machine really begins or ends.

    - Kelton Sears, Seattle Weekly

    Bio:

    In

    the 19th century, metropolitan Seattle was founded

    by

    freemasons, occultists, and

    spiritualists

    but

    today,

    it

    s being dramatically rebuilt

    by

    the tech sector. Out

    of

    this strange

    intersection

    of

    energies

    in

    the city

    s history emerges Charms, a biomechanical noise punk tr

    io

    whose necro-electro sound

    is

    akin

    to

    a thousand broken computers surging with blue crystal

    power. Propelled

    by

    the piston-like industrial drumming

    of

    Ray McCoy, bubbling cauldron guitar

    of

    E.J. Tolentino, and the haunted alchemical bass synth

    of

    Josh McCormick, the group

    s hyper-

    kinetic freakouts are a manifestation

    of

    the anxieties

    of

    Seattle

    a city staring down what could

    either

    be

    a transhumanist utopian biofuture

    or

    a posthumanist dystopian decline.

    It

    s a concept the band drives home both sonically and visu

    ally with the help

    of

    projectionist

    Kevin Blanquies. Charms frequently plays shows

    in

    front

    of

    live feeds

    of

    themselves performing,

    the video feeding back

    on

    itself into

    an

    uneasy infinity

    as

    the group writhes around

    in

    epileptic

    fits. The future,

    as

    Charms

    music, weighs heavy, and there

    s

    no

    telling where the intersection

    of

    man and machine really begins

    or

    ends.

    - Kelton Sears, Seattle Weekly

Click To View More From @IcelandNatural
Inspired by Iceland